Location, Spaces and Distance (Unwin, Chapter 2)

This material is excerpted from the book, Numbers aren’t nasty: A workbook of spatial concepts, by David J. Unwin, Emeritus Professor of Geography. A description of the entire workbook and a downloadable copy are here. "In this chapter we develop

Patterns of Point Objects (Unwin, Chapter 3)

This material is excerpted from the book, Numbers aren’t nasty: A workbook of spatial concepts, by David J. Unwin, Emeritus Professor of Geography. A description of the entire workbook and a downloadable copy are here. "This chapter continues the examination

Lines on Maps (Unwin, Chapter 4)

This material is excerpted from the book, Numbers aren’t nasty: A workbook of spatial concepts, by David J. Unwin, Emeritus Professor of Geography. A description of the entire workbook and a downloadable copy are here. "This chapter deals with the

Area: the devil’s variable? (Unwin, Chapter 5)

This material is excerpted from the book, Numbers aren’t nasty: A workbook of spatial concepts, by David J. Unwin, Emeritus Professor of Geography. A description of the entire workbook and a downloadable copy are here. "In this chapter we develop

Fields (Unwin, Chapter 6)

This material is excerpted from the book, Numbers aren’t nasty: A workbook of spatial concepts, by David J. Unwin, Emeritus Professor of Geography. A description of the entire workbook and a downloadable copy are here. "This chapter provides a series

Locations, space and distance (Unwin, Chapter 2)

In this chapter we develop student’s appreciation of the ‘first order’ basic spatial concepts of location, scale, adjacency, distance, and projection as well as the variety of ways by which they can be ‘measured’ in different ‘spaces.

Tversky (2005)

Functional Significance of Visuospatial Representations   Abstract 150-200 Mental spaces are not unitary. Rather, people conceive of different spaces differently, depending on the functions they serve. Four such spaces are considered here. The space of the body subserves proprioception and

Janelle and Goodchild (2011)

Abstract: From the Introduction: “This chapter describes how technologies for gathering, processing, analyzing, and displaying geo-referenced information have opened paths for spatial thinking and for the discovery of complex relationships that are revealed most clearly in geographical context. It outlines