Page 1

Structure and function in living systems

teaching standard spatial concepts

Living systems at all levels of organization demonstrate the complementary nature of structure and function. Important levels of organization for structure and function include cells, organs, tissues, organ systems, whole organisms, and ecosystems. 156 C (5-8)

cell, composition, function, hierarchy, level, organization, structure

All organisms are composed of cells–the fundamental unit of life. Most organisms are single cells; other organisms, including humans, are multicellular. 156 C (5-8)

cell, composition, multicellular, unit

Cells carry on the many functions needed to sustain life. They grow and divide, thereby producing more cells. This requires that they take in nutrients, which they use to provide energy for the work that cells do and to make the materials that a cell or an organism needs. 156 C (5-8)

absorption, divide, division, grow, growth

Specialized cells perform specialized functions in multicellular organisms. Groups of specialized cells cooperate to form a tissue, such as a muscle. Different tissues are in turn grouped together to form larger functional units, called organs. Each type of cell, tissue, and organ has a distinct structure and set of functions that serve the organism as a whole. 156 C (5-8)

cell, cooperation, formation, group, multicellular, size, structure, unit

The human organism has systems for digestion, respiration, reproduction, circulation, excretion, movement, control and coordination, and for protection from disease. These systems interact with one another. 156 C (5-8)

coordination, excretion, interaction, motion, movement, system

Disease is a breakdown in structures or functions of an organism. Some diseases are the result of intrinsic failures of the system. Others are the result of damage by infection by other organisms. 157 C (5-8)

decomposition, infection, structure

Reproduction is a characteristic of all living systems; because no individual organism lives forever, reproduction is essential to the continuation of every species. Some organisms reproduce asexually. Other organisms reproduce sexually. 157 C (5-8)

teaching standard spatial concepts

In many species, including humans, females produce eggs and males produce sperm. Plants also reproduce sexually–the egg and sperm are produced in the flowers of flowering plants. An egg and sperm unite to begin the development of a new individual. That new individual receives genetic information from its mother (via the egg) and its father (via the sperm). Sexually produced offspring never are identical to either of their parents. 157 C (5-8)

production, receive, unite, uniting

Every organism requires a set of instructions for specifying its traits. Heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another. 157 C (5-8)

passage

Hereditary information is contained in genes, located in the chromosomes of each cell. Each gene carries a single unit of information. An inherited trait of an individual can be determined by one or many genes, and a single gene can influence more than one trait. A human cell contains many thousands of different genes. 157 C (5-8)

containment, location, transport

Reproduction and heredity

teaching standard spatial concepts

In many species, including humans, females produce eggs and males produce sperm. Plants also reproduce sexually–the egg and sperm are produced in the flowers of flowering plants. An egg and sperm unite to begin the development of a new individual. That new individual receives genetic information from its mother (via the egg) and its father (via the sperm). Sexually produced offspring never are identical to either of their parents. 157 C (5-8)

production, receive, unite, uniting

Every organism requires a set of instructions for specifying its traits. Heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another. 157 C (5-8)

passage

Hereditary information is contained in genes, located in the chromosomes of each cell. Each gene carries a single unit of information. An inherited trait of an individual can be determined by one or many genes, and a single gene can influence more than one trait. A human cell contains many thousands of different genes. 157 C (5-8)

containment, location, transport
Page 2

Reproduction and heredity

teaching standard spatial concepts

The characteristics of an organism can be described in terms of a combination of traits. Some traits are inherited and others result from interactions with the environment. 157 C (5-8)

combination, environment, interaction

Regulation and behavior

teaching standard spatial concepts

All organisms must be able to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment. 157 C (5-8)

environment, external, grow, growth, internal, obtain

Regulation of an organism’s internal environment involves sensing the internal environment and changing physiological activities to keep conditions within the range required to survive. 157 C (5-8)

environment, internal

Behavior is one kind of response an organism can make to an internal or environmental stimulus. A behavioral response requires coordination and communication at many levels, including cells, organ systems, and whole organisms. Behavioral response is a set of actions determined in part by heredity and in part from experience. 157 C (5-8)

communication, coordination, environment, hierarchy, internal, level, stimulation, stimulus

An organism’s behavior evolves through adaptation to its environment. How a species moves, obtains food, reproduces, and responds to danger are based in the species’ evolutionary history. 157 C (5-8)

behavior, environment, motion, movement

Population and ecosystems

teaching standard spatial concepts

A population consists of all individuals of a species that occur together at a given place and time. All populations living together and the physical factors with which they interact compose an ecosystem.

co-location, co-occurrence, composition, ecosystem, interaction, place, proximity, time

Populations of organisms can be categorized by the function they serve in an ecosystem. Plants and some micro-organisms are producers–they make their own food. All animals, including humans, are consumers, which obtain food by eating other organisms. Decomposers, primarily bacteria and fungi, are consumers that use waste materials and dead organisms for food. Food webs identify the relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in an ecosystem. 157 C (5-8)

ecosystem, interaction, scale, web

For ecosystems, the major source of energy is sunlight. Energy entering ecosystems as sunlight is transferred by producers into chemical energy through photosynthesis. That energy then passes from organism to organism in food webs. 158 C (5-8)

ecosystem, enter, exit, sunlight, transfer, web

The number of organisms an ecosystem can support depends on the resources available and abiotic factors, such as quantity of light and water, range of temperatures, and soil composition. Given adequate biotic and abiotic resources and no disease or predators, populations (including humans) increase at rapid rates. Lack of resources and other factors, such as predation and climate, limit the growth of populations in specific niches in the ecosystem. 158 C (5-8)

availability, composition, ecosystem, growth, niche, quantity, range, rate

Diversity and adaptations of organisms

teaching standard spatial concepts

Millions of species of animals, plants, and micro-organisms are alive today. Although different species might look dissimilar, the unity among organisms becomes apparent from an analysis of internal structures, the similarity of their chemical processes, and the evidence of common ancestry. 158 C (5-8)

internal, scale, structure, unity
Page 3

Diversity and adaptations of organisms

teaching standard spatial concepts

Biological evolution accounts for the diversity of species developed through gradual processes over many generations. Species acquire many of their unique characteristics through biological adaptation, which involves the selection of naturally occurring variations in populations. Biological adaptations include changes in structures, behaviors, or physiology that enhance survival and reproductive success in a particular environment. 158 C (5-8)

environment, structure

Extinction of a species occurs when the environment changes and the adaptive characteristics of a species are insufficient to allow survival. Fossils indicate that many organisms that lived long ago are extinct. Extinction of species is common; most of the species that have lived on the earth no longer exist. 158 C (5-8)

environment, fossil