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We have annotated several hundred teaching resources cataloged in the National Science Digital Library with spatial concept terms listed below. We have also created a new TeachSpatial collection annotated in the same way. The concept terms were drawn from the U.S.National Science Education Standards (NSES 1996) for topic areas B - Physical Science, C - Life Science, D - Earth and Space Science, as well as from the 1994 U.S. Geography Teaching Standards for grades 9-12. Those standards can be browsed here.

spatial concept terms

NSDL teaching resources related to "level"

This reference describes the relationship between reef formation and sea level, how it can be used to detect ancient changes in sea level, and how it might be used to predict the results of future increases in sea level. Topics include the coral environment, how reefs respond to changes in sea level, and how limestone forms. There is also an activity in which students use maps of present and past shorelines, bathymetry, and reef locations to predict where Florida's reefs might form in the future.

What Can Florida's Reefs and Limestone Tell Us About Sea Level Change?

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This Classroom Connectors lesson plan teaches about the relationships of organisms in ecosystems. Students construct models of ecosystems, recognize different trophic levels, recreate food chains, and differentiate energy flow and nutrient cycling. The site provides goals, objectives, an outline, time required, materials, activities, and closure ideas for the lesson. The Classroom Connectors address content with an activity approach while incorporating themes necessary to raise the activity to a higher cognition level.

Interrelationships in Ecosystems (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

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This article is a Why Files short piece that examines the movement of Antarctic ice sheets into the ocean. Both East and West Antarctic ice sheets are rapidly moving into the Southern Ocean, which could raise sea level by 70 meters causing massive problems for populated coastal areas around the world. This article looks at the evidence for these events, and what it could mean for coastal regions.

Ice in Antarctica (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

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