NSDL teaching resources related to “migration”

Who were the first Americans, when did they arrive, and from where did they come? With limited evidence, scientists have long proposed a hypothesis that linked the migration route and the timing of the migration of these ancient people to the end of the last ice age.

When Did the First Americans Arrive?

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This resource provides information about acid rain, a widespread term used to describe all forms of acid precipitation. The sources, nature, and chemistry of acid rain are discussed, along with its impact on buildings, soils, freshwater lakes, trees, and wildlife. Other topics include measuring, modeling, and monitoring acid rain; and vehicle and industrial emission controls. The problem of airborne pollutants migrating across international borders is also discussed.

Enviropedia: Introduction to Acid Rain

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In this lesson, the first in a set of lessons exploring migration, genetic markers, markers in context, and the Genographic Project (a five-year study of human origins and migration based on genetic markers), students will explore the concept of migration from a historical perspective. As a means of creating a personal connection, students will first explore a modern migration of people with their surname. In a class discussion, students will then define migration, focusing on the different types of movements of people.

Genographic: Mapping the Human Journey

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Collaborative migration behavior exerted by Proteus mirabilis cells on the surface of a low-agar medium. The organisms were differentiating into elongated hyperflagellates and gathering for migration.

Collaborative Surface Migration Behavior of Proteus mirabilis

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In a paper delivered to the Journal of the Statistical Society in England in 1885, E. G. Ravenstein, a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society, outlined a series of “laws of migration” that attempted to explain and predict migration patterns both within and between nations. Ravenstein’s basic laws, and additional laws subsequently derived from his work, continue to serve as the starting point for virtually all serious models of migration patterns over a century later.

Ernest George Ravenstein: The Laws of Migration, 1885

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Although he is not known for explicitly spatial analyses, Vance paid close attention to the patterning of economic and demographic factors across places. This allowed him to challenge prevailing theories about the American South and make three main contributions to understanding his home region that loosely follow the contours of his career: ecological and geographic factors in Southern exceptionalism; the spatial basis of Southern migration; and a deeper consideration of regionalism.

Rupert B. Vance: Space and the American South

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